Episode 2

In this second episode of Future Hindsight, we talk to Matt Kalmans, CEO and co-founder of Applecart, a strategic political consultancy and lab.

Human communication is the strongest tool for high civic engagement

Most decisions we make on a day-to-day basis are based on what our friends and co-workers tell us. Real life conversations are deeply influental in our political behavior. Social pressure can bring about social change.

Voting is our political power!

Voting is our civic duty and is a matter of public record. Changing behavior from not-voting to voting continues in the long term. Higher voting turnout will lead to radically different people being voted into office. People who are not only solution-oriented, but will also be a better representative of us as a society!

We respond to social pressure for civic duty

People respond to social pressure for higher civic engagement and voter participation. Voting is understood to be a social good, and studies have shown that we respond to social pressure for higher civic engagement and voter participation.

“Most Americans lack a pretty fundamental commitment to participating in the political process. It’s not a positive thing… I believe that is where most of the issues in this country stem from. You have a democracy where almost nobody participates and advocates for their own best interests and that of their community. It’s sort of a fundamental tenet of a well-functioning democracy.” – Matt Kalmans